Researching the American Revolution

Your source for information on the American War of Independence

Continental Army

Reenacting Washington Crossing the Delaware to attack the Hessians at Trenton on December 26, 1776

References on the organization, officer corps and operations of the Continental Army.

Berg, Fred Anderson. Encyclopedia of Continental Army Units–Battalions, Regiments, and Independent Corps. Harrisburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books, 1972.

Berg’s work provides an overview of the organization of the Continental Army.  It provides a brief overview of the Army’s organizaiton history with estimates of force size and compositions.

Heitman, Francis B. Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution. Clearfield, 1932.

The authoritative source for information on Continental Army officers including names, ranks and dates of service.  It is a good source to check on ranks and name spelling even when identified in well known secondary source.

Martin, James Kirby, and Mark Edward Lender. A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789. The American History Series. Arlington Heights, Ill: H. Davidson, 1982.

An overview of the origin and evolution of the Continental Army from its roots in the militia through the creation of a professional, European style fighting force.  A good overview on militiary operations and capabilities.  The book is organized into two year periods and covers military and political events.

Salley, A. S., ed. Records of the Regiments of the South Carolina Line in the Revolutionary War. Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co, 1977.

At the height, South Carolina furnished 6 regiments to the war effort.  By 1780, the initial regiments were consolidated into 3 infantry regiments.

 

Overview Military Biographies for selected officers

American Military Biography Containing the Lives and Characters of the Officers of the Revolution Who Were Most Distinguished in Achieving Our National Independence.  Also the Life of Gilbert Motier La Fayette. Cincinnati: E. Walters, 1830.

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